Category Archives: Tips

Online Banking FAQ

1. How do I enroll for consumer online banking?
You can enroll right from our website, http://www.syb.com. Click the Enroll link in the Log In
section and follow the steps. You can also enroll at any of our branch office locations

2. Is there a fee for consumer online banking?
There is no fee for consumer online banking or Billpay. There is a nominal fee for Mobile Deposit.

3. What is a Secure Access Code and why do I need one?
When you login for the first time, you will be prompted to receive a Secure Access Code.
A Secure Access Code is a one-time use code that allows you to securely login to our online banking system and is delivered to you via phone call or SMS text. You will also need a Secure Access Code if you delete your security certificate or “cookie” that we’ve stored on your computer, or if you login from a computer that was not registered for repeated use. Choosing to “register my computer for later use” authorizes us to store a security certificate on your computer which will speed up the verification process in the future, and eliminate the need to use a Secure Access Code on each login.

4. How do I log in for the first time?
After enrolling, you will receive an email to let you know when you can log in for the first time. On the SYB.com home page enter your User ID that you created during enrollment and click the Sign In button. On the next screen, select “I am new user” and enter your Login ID again. You will be directed to a page displaying the secure contact information we have on file for your account. Select one Secure Access Code delivery method from the list you can access immediately: phone or SMS (text message), then click Submit. Note-The Secure Access Code is only good for 15 minutes. If it expires, you will need to request a new one. Enter the Secure Access Code, click Submit. Read the Online Banking Agreement, click I Accept. Create a password, click Submit.
NOTE: If you choose not to register the computer you will be asked to go through the Secure Access Code process each time you login on this computer. You should NOT register a public computer or a computer that others might use outside of your control.

5. Why do I have to enter a Secure Access Code every time I login even though I registered my computer?
If you delete system cookies, whether manually or through an automated process, the activation will be erased and you’ll have to use a Secure Access Code each time you login. You can make changes to your cookie settings through your browser.

6. How can I change my Login ID or Password?
Under Settings click on “Security Preferences”

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5 Ways to Spot a Lottery Scam

According to the FBI, in 2014 consumers lost more than $8 million to solicitation scams promising instant wealth and grand prize earnings. These scams, commonly referred to as the “advance fee,” “lottery” or “sweepstake” scam, involve fraudsters issuing counterfeit checks and fake award letters to consumers who have allegedly won a lottery or sweepstake raffle. The consumer, who most likely never entered the alleged drawing, is issued a check worth more than the amount owed and instructed to pay taxes and fees before receiving their lump sum payment. Unfortunately, the check — in addition to the raffle — is bogus.

Before you participate in any lottery or sweepstake, Stock Yards Bank & Trust encourages you to keep these tips in mind:

• Don’t be fooled by the appearance of the check. Scam artists are using sophisticated technology to create counterfeit checks that mirror the appearance of legitimate checks. Some are counterfeit money orders, some are phony cashier’s checks and others look like they are from legitimate business accounts. The companies whose names appear may be real, but someone has dummied up the checks without their knowledge.

• Never ‘pay to play.’ There is no legitimate reason for someone who is giving you money to ask you to wire money back or send you more than the exact amount —that’s a red flag that it’s a scam. If a stranger wants to pay you for something, insist on a cashier’s check for the exact amount, preferably from a local bank or one with a local branch.

• Verify the requestor before you wire or issue a check. It is important to know who you are sending money to before you send it. Just because someone contacted you doesn’t mean they are a trusted source.

• Ensure a check has “cleared” to be most safe. Under federal law, banks must make deposited funds available quickly, but just because you can withdraw the money doesn’t mean the check is good, even if it’s a cashier’s check or money order. Be sure to ask if the check has cleared, not merely if the funds are available before you decide to spend the money.

• Report any suspected fraud to your bank immediately. Bank staff are experts in spotting fraudulent checks. If you think someone is trying to pull a fake check scam, don’t deposit it—report it. Contact your local bank or the National Consumers League’s Fraud Center, fraud.org.

For more information about fake check scams and how you can avoid them, go to fakechecks.org.

Resource information provided by the American Bankers Association

Betting, Hoping and Planning

by Neil Byrne, JD, LLM, CPA Stock Yards Bank Wealth Management & Trust


It is almost Derby time. So what better topic to discuss than betting?

According to the dictionary, a bet is defined as “an act of risking a sum of money on the outcome of a future event.” Hope is defined as “a feeling of expectation and desire for a certain thing to happen.” Finally, a plan is defined as “a detailed proposal for doing or achieving something.”

All of these concepts are wonderful in their own right, and can bring joy to individuals in the right context. It is fun to bet on the Derby, or to hope your tournament bracket wins your office pool. Unfortunately, too many people are unnecessarily making a bet on retirement security by simply hoping their savings, Social Security, and other resources will be enough.

Most people choose their career, their college major, and their home, not to mention their spouse, among various other important items in their life. What about retirement? How many people are hoping to be able to retire “one day” but haven’t put together a detailed plan for actually retiring? If you have not put together a plan, then you likely are not planning for retirement, but rather, are betting on retiring – one day.

Below are a couple of items to consider when putting together a retirement plan. While things like investment returns, basis, and tax rates are unquestionably important, for a moment, we suggest that you think “bigger picture,” and ponder how some more basic considerations can affect your successful retirement plan.

Your Needs and Wants
Even the age at which you retire is up for consideration. After all, setting a uniform retirement age is said to have been started in Germany by Chancellor Otto Von Bismarck, at least partially as a way for him to force troublesome government employees into retirement. Germany initially set it at 70, and then lowered it to 65*. Of course, whether that is true or not, neither Chancellor Von Bismarck, nor anyone else should really dictate when you retire. Naturally, taking retirement benefits that are only available at certain ages into account is an important part of the plan. But, with a little foresight, you can retire when it is appropriate for you.

After all, retirement is about you. To ensure that you are making the best decisions, you will want to have a good handle on your family dynamics, as well as your budget, assets, and liabilities. Do you have robust savings that can withstand unforeseen expenses? Have you considered what your wants and needs truly are? It may be appropriate to “bet” or “hope” for a dream item down the road, but we want you to plan for your true needs and wants in retirement.

Your Biases
Personal biases can have long-term consequences, and so, many people have a critical need for objective retirement advice. A 2008 book by Professor Dan Ariely, Predictably Irrational, explains many of our biases and how they affect several facets of modern life. Two sections of the book, however, are especially relevant here.

First, people like to procrastinate – big surprise. But, it is true, and it can harm your retirement readiness.

Second, people like to keep all their options open for as long as possible, even when inaction produces a negative outcome. Undoubtedly, financial planning can be complicated. Moreover, retirement planning forces you to make an avalanche of choices – when should I draw Social Security? When should I stop working? Is Long Term Care Insurance for me? And on and on . . .

These two biases can work together to turn a plan into a bet before you even realize it. Betting may be fun on the first Saturday in May, but leave the betting for the track, and the hoping for your tournament bracket. Let’s plan for your retirement.

*See: https://www.ssa.gov/history/age65.html AND http://mentalfloss.com/article/31014/why-retirement-age-65

5 Tips to Spring Clean Your Finances

For many Americans, spring is a time to clean, sort and tidy up around the house.  As you dust your shelves and rid your home of clutter, consider setting aside some time to organize your finances.

“The arrival of spring motivates people to renew their surroundings, and what better way to focus that momentum than to check off everything on your financial to-do list?” asked Corey Carlisle, executive director of the ABA Foundation. “Taking stock of your finances and planting the seeds of new saving habits today will go a long way toward alleviating pressures on your pocket throughout the year.”

The American Bankers Association recommends these five tips to help you refresh your finances:

  • Evaluate and pay down debt. Take a look at how much you owe and what you are paying in interest. If there are better rates available now, consider requesting a lower credit card interest rate or refinancing your mortgage. Begin paying off existing debt, whether that’s by chipping away at loans with the highest interest rates or eliminating smaller debt first.
  • Review your budget. A lot can change in a year. If you’ve been promoted, had a child, or become a new homeowner or renter, be sure to update your budget. Determine what expenses demand the most money and identify areas where you can realistically cut back. Develop a strategy for spending and saving and stick to it.
  • Check your credit report. Every year, you are guaranteed one free credit report from each of the three bureaus. Take advantage of these free reports and check them for any possible errors. Mistakes can drag down your score and prevent you from getting a loan, or cause you to pay a higher than necessary interest rate.
  • Sign up for e-statements, paperless billing and text alerts. Converting to paperless billing will help keep your house—physical and financial—more clean and organized, and will help protect you from fraud.
  • Set up automatic bill pay. By signing up for automatic bill pay, you’ll never have to worry about a missed payment impacting your credit score. You can set it so that money is withdrawn from your checking account on the same day each month.

 

Resource information provided by the American Bankers Association 

The Importance of Financial Planning at Any Age

DISCLAIMER: THIS ARTICLE WAS WRITTEN BY ADVICENT SOLUTIONS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. ©2013, 2016 ADVICENT SOLUTIONS, AN ENTITY UNRELATED TO STOCK YARDS BANK & TRUST. THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS ARTICLE IS NOT INTENDED TO BE TAX, INVESTMENT, OR LEGAL ADVICE, AND IT MAY NOT BE RELIED ON FOR THE PURPOSE OF AVOIDING ANY TAX PENALTIES. STOCK YARDS BANK & TRUST DOES NOT PROVIDE TAX OR LEGAL ADVICE. YOU ARE ENCOURAGED TO CONSULT WITH YOUR TAX ADVISOR OR ATTORNEY REGARDING SPECIFIC TAX ISSUES.

It’s easy to think that a financial plan is only necessary when you need to make a big purchase or rearrange your portfolio. However, financial planning affects much more than your bank account, and a successful plan should follow you through all the stages of your life. In a financial climate where more than half of Americans don’t have a budget and just over 40 percent of baby boomers don’t have a will, it seems that many could benefit from planning. Yet the fact remains that just one out of three household financial decision-makers say they have any kind of comprehensive financial plan. Prevalent among the reasons to avoid planning are “I’m too young to need a financial plan,” “I’m too old to get a financial plan,” or “I’ve made it this long without one, so why get one now?” When these doubts are raised, it’s important to consider that your financial plan isn’t something that can be made and then forgotten about, nor should it only be remembered when you find you’re low on funds; to succeed, it will need to be fluid and change as your situation changes. Read on to discover the importance of financial planning at any age.

ON YOUR MARK, GET SET, GO! PLANNING IN YOUR 20s

As a 20-something, you probably think that you’re too young and have too few resources to warrant a financial plan. Before you write off financial planning using this logic, consider that your 20s are when you establish the financial base for the rest of your life. You’re likely earning your first salary and dealing with your first large sources of debt in student loans and car payments. You may be faced with buying your own insurance and investing on your own for the first time. You also have the widest range of financial goals in your 20s, as most of your major life events are still ahead of you. Meeting with a financial planner during this time can improve your financial literacy, helping you learn things like how to set up an emergency fund, make a spending plan and establish good credit. It can also help you set up a basic estate plan, something that’s easy to overlook in your 20s. It can be overwhelming when you’re starting out to be bombarded with all of the things you could be putting money toward. A financial plan can help you prioritize where your money should go by determining your most significant money goals and how to reach them.

Not only are these years a crucial time for financial education, but disregarding a financial plan could cause you to unintentionally squander the biggest asset of your 20s—time. With the power of compound interest, the money you save or invest now can grow exponentially, but wait another 10 years and you may have to contribute a lot more to achieve the same end result. Bottom line? The earlier you start saving and the longer you give your money to grow, the better. There’s no better time to start establishing good money habits than in your 20s, and that all starts with a financial plan

TAKE IT TO THE NEXT LEVEL. PLANNING IN YOUR 30s

If your 20s are to build a foundation for your own financial literacy, your 30s teach you how to cope when that foundation shifts and you find yourself dealing with new and larger challenges. A financial plan at this age can help you deal with some of life’s biggest transitions, such as starting a family or becoming a homeowner. These can bring on newer and bigger sources of debt, so a crucial aspect of financial planning at this time is to eliminate non-mortgage debt, such as paying off your car and student loans and paying down credit card debt. These big life changes may also trigger a need for expanded insurance coverage on your home or extended life insurance, if you have a family depending on you. For the same reason, you should review your estate plan, making sure you have a will, living will and power of attorney. You set up the basics of a financial plan in your 20s, and it’s time to reevaluate now that your earnings power has likely increased. You should set a more definite plan for retirement and focus on contributing a set amount each month rather than just maintaining an account. A financial plan can help you review and understand your asset allocation among various types of investments, aligning your investment decisions with your lowered risk tolerance and time horizon. It’s also a good time to check on your emergency fund, and make sure you have three to six months’ worth of income saved should an unforeseen crisis affect your life. Finally, a financial plan can help you direct some of your increased earnings to charity, as you may be approaching a time in your life when you feel stable enough to give back.

MAKE IT OR BREAK IT. PLANNING IN YOUR 40s

Your 40s are a crucial decade for building up retirement savings, and a financial plan can help you make sure you’re on track. While many will start a retirement account on their own, it can be hard to budget for both retirement and non-retirement savings. In fact, roughly one out of three U.S. adults have no form of nonretirement savings. Without financial planning, it can be hard to focus on saving for multiple goals and prioritizing the importance of those goals at different times in your life. For example, although paying for your children’s education may be a factor during your 40s, remember that while there are loans and scholarships available for college, the same is not true for retirement. So, while it’s important to save for both goals, you may have to put your own savings first by allotting more money to a retirement fund than to your child’s education. This can be difficult, especially since most parents are used to putting their children’s needs before their own. Having the third-party perspective of a financial advisor can be especially on the best way to reach multiple financial goals. Your 40s are also a good time to do an overall review of your plan. You may need to increase your insurance coverage, as the insurance offered through your employer may no longer be enough to cover you and your family in the case of a crisis. You will also want to review your estate planning documents and make sure your beneficiaries are up to date. And, since your earnings are likely peaking and this is truly the “make it or break it” time for your retirement savings, your plan should help you determine how to allocate more money toward your IRA or 401(k).

IN THE HOME STRETCH. PLANNING IN YOUR 50s/60s (preretirement)

During this phase of your life, retirement stops being a far-off, abstract concept and becomes real. You should engage in retirement planning with your spouse, including choosing a retirement age and discussing the types of activities you’d like to pursue during retirement. You may want to evaluate your health, as health and insurance needs can factor heavily into your retirement budget. You should be estimating your Social Security benefits and maximizing contributions to your retirement account, including catch-up contributions that you are now eligible for. Since many large expenses, such as your mortgage payment, may soon be behind you, you can push to eliminate a lot of your debt so you can head into retirement debt-free. To stay on top of all of these tasks, you can think of your financial plan during this time as a preretirement checklist, ensuring you’ve covered all of your bases so that you can enjoy the relaxation you deserve during retirement. In addition to checking off your preretirement tasks, it’s likely that a large part of your financial planning will focus on protecting the retirement savings you already have and creating an income strategy for retirement. Because you now have a lower risk tolerance and less time to recover from a dip in the market, your investment strategy will probably need to be more conservative. Ultimately, your financial plan can help you cross-reference your retirement needs and goals with your retirement income, and your financial advisor can help you project whether this income can provide for you throughout your retirement.

KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON. PLANNING DURING RETIREMENT

You may think that once you reach retirement, you no longer have to worry about financial planning. After all, you’ve made it this far, right? However, there are many unique financial considerations for retirees, not the least of which is how to effectively transfer your wealth to the next generation. You should review your estate plan to make sure that everything is up-to-date and correct, and determine how you want your wealth to be allocated upon your death. Depending on your situation, this may include providing for family and/or friends, setting up trusts or making arrangements for an after-death charitable donation.

As your health needs change during retirement, a financial plan can also help you consider the impact of different senior living options on your budget and evaluate what kind of health care and insurance you need and are eligible for. Similar to your younger years, you will likely have a lot of planning surrounding cash flow issues and how to make the most of your income. Far from being over, financial planning can play a large role in your retiree years, helping you live out the remainder of your life comfortably and with peace of mind.

Stock Yards Wealth Management & Trust wants to be your partner in your financial journey. Our team of Financial Planners provides a process that is complete, from start to finish. We provide a comprehensive set of solutions that are customized to fit your individual needs. No matter what phase of life you are in, we provide the plan and the guidance to help ensure that you are on track to achieve your financial goals.

 

All You Need Is Love — And Financial Intimacy

It’s the season of love, but before couples taking the next step in their relationship, they should shape their financial plan. Stock Yards Bank & Trust reminds customers that taking the next step is not only a marriage of hearts but also a marriage of finances.

Stock Yards Bank & Trust suggests couples use the following tips to achieve financial intimacy:

1. Be mine, or yours? Will you and your spouse-to-be keep finances separated or combine them? Consider individual money styles, having one joint savings account and then separate accounts that you can use how you’d like. Making these financial decisions together will help you find a system that works for you.

2. Love’s Cost. Couples that tackle money problems together, and take mutual responsibility for solving them, will inevitably find that their overall relationships are better for it, so calculate your monthly costs and discuss how bills will be paid. Both may contribute to the bill payment, but who will physically write the check to pay the bills, monitor the investments and take care of the taxes. Consider setting a date every month to review and discuss finances.

3. Sharing Credit. It’s important that spouses are aware of the others’ credit situation. Marrying a person with bad credit will not drag down your stellar record. However, your other half’s credit will be factored in when applying for joint financing. Knowing ahead of time will help you to plan more strategically.

4. Cupid’s Arrow. Couples should develop a plan to shoot down existing debt, starting with the balances that carry the highest interest rates. Whether or not the pair works as a team or alone, debt must be tackled. Think twice before every purchase and ask yourself if it’s worth not putting that money in your savings. You’ll be able to eliminating frivolous spending this way while keeping your priorities top of mind.

5. Sweet Savings. Saving as a couple fosters teamwork and is essential in times of financial hardship. Decide how much you want to save as a couple and do it automatically from your paychecks. It’s important to be realistic when budgeting your monthly savings goal.
Resource information provided by the American Bankers Association.

First-Time Homebuyers: 6 Tips to Save for the House of Your Dreams

According to a 2015 BMO Harris report, 52 percent of Americans plan to buy a home in the next five years.  Saving for a down payment, typically between 5 to 20 percent of the home’s value, is one of the biggest challenges for those aspiring homebuyers. The American Bankers Association Foundation is highlighting six tips to help consumers cut costs and start saving.

“A down payment is often the largest single payment a consumer makes in their lifetime and saving for it isn’t easy,” said Corey Carlisle, executive director of the ABA Foundation. “However, with a few changes, consumers can put themselves on track to make their homeownership dream a reality.”

The ABA Foundation offers prospective homebuyers these saving strategies:

Develop a budget & timeline. Start by determining how much you’ll need for a down payment. Create a budget and calculate how much you can realistically save each month – that will help you gauge when you’ll be ready to transition from renter to homeowner.

Establish a separate savings account. Set up a separate savings account exclusively for your down payment and make your monthly contributions automatic. By keeping this money separate, you’ll be less likely to tap into it when you’re tight on cash. If you received a tax refund, consider putting all or a portion into this account.

Shop around to reduce major monthly expenses. It’s a good idea to check rates for your car insurance, renter’s insurance, health insurance, cable, internet or cell phone plan. There may be deals or promotions available that allow you to save hundreds of dollars by adjusting your contracts.

Monitor your spending. With online banking, keeping an eye on your spending is easier than ever. Track where most of your discretionary income is going. Identify areas where you could cut back (e.g. nice meals out, vacations, etc.) and instead put that money into savings.

Celebrate savings milestones. Saving enough for a down payment can be daunting. To avoid getting discouraged, break it up into smaller goals and reward yourself when you reach each one. If you need to save $30,000 total, consider treating yourself to a nice meal every $5,000 saved. This will help you stay motivated throughout the process.

Look into state and local home-buying programs. Many states, counties and local governments operate programs for first-time homebuyers. Some programs offer housing discounts, while others provide down payment loans or grants. Stock Yard’s Mortgage Banking Group can help you determine what types of offers are available in your area.

Information provided by the American Bankers Association.