Category Archives: Wealth Management

INVESTMENT INSIGHTS

by Joan Schade

Stock Yards Bank Wealth Management & Trust


We all like to plan and dream about how we’ll spend our retirement years. What does your plan look like? Will you travel, play golf, garden, or visit with friends and family? Maybe you’re planning to move, or perhaps you’d simply like to spend some time relaxing and enjoying some well-earned rest. Sometimes, however, unplanned events arise that leave us stunned and thinking, “What just happened?” Fortunately, if we have the right type of insurance in place it can make dealing with the unexpected a whole lot easier.

When you start to plan for your retirement years it is always a good idea to review the insurance you already have in place. Consider if your needs or objectives have changed since you made the original purchase. For example, was your term policy to insure that your children’s education would be covered or that your house would be paid off should something happen to the main bread winner? If your children are grown and there are only a few payments left on the mortgage, your current policy may not be the right type of protection needed at this stage in your life.

Purchasing insurance to provide some income for a surviving spouse is common, but you may also want to look at a long-term care policy. Without the right kind of insurance, you could be forced to use all of your hard-earned savings, including your retirement savings to pay for care. The cost of such needs continues to grow by leaps and bounds. Long Term Care Insurance policy options have grown as well in the last decade. As opposed to the “use it or lose it” options in years past, many policies now offer a wide array of hybrid products that will allow you and/or your spouse to use what you need and pass any remaining dollars on to your beneficiaries tax-free.

Insuring for the right purpose today could protect the quality of your retirement years. Wouldn’t we all like our retirement dreams to come true?

For more information about Investment Plans, please contact our Wealth Management and Trust Department.

 

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The Basics of Creating a Life Plan

by Claudette W. Patton, J.D.

Stock Yards Bank Wealth Management & Trust


Preparing a Life Plan is all about living and making good choices about your legacy. Most people avoid planning because they think it’s morbid to think about death, but a Life Plan – estate planning – isn’t about dying at all. It’s simply providing direction for your legacy and determining how you want to be remembered by your community, family, charities, and personal causes. It is a chronicle of your life’s work with a plan to continue the fruits of your work for the benefit of others.

The most important question remains: “Do you want to control your personal life legacy?” A well written and thought out Life Plan keeps you in control of your life even after you’re gone. The list of those who do not plan is replete with examples of unintended ex- spouses, estranged siblings, children with addictions, and others being granted inheritances by state intestacy law (lawyer lingo for “without a will”). A recent example of a man who did not control his legacy is the music legend, Prince. According to court documents filed in a Minnesota probate court, Prince Roger Nelson left no instructions to divide his belongings. As a result, state law could divide his vast estate equally among 8 siblings. It is reported Prince has one surviving full sister, five surviving half siblings, and two deceased half siblings (with surviving children). Some of these heirs had not spoken with Prince in over twenty years. However, Minnesota state law does not distinguish between full and half siblings, plus any personal relationship to Prince is irrelevant. Would Prince have approved of this distribution? Would you?

The following is a Life Plan “Control Checklist” to assist in protecting and directing your legacy:

Control Who Inherits Your Legacy and Designate The Amount For Each Heir

Many people assume everything in an estate automatically goes to the spouse. Please be aware not every state law automatically passes the entire estate to a spouse! I repeat. A spouse may not automatically inherit everything without a Will. Some states only allow a spouse 1/3 of an estate due to parental inheritance distribution laws. According to Kentucky intestacy law, a spouse may be fourth in the line of distribution. Also, state laws typically divide assets equally to the state designated heirs without consideration of a spendthrift relative, or someone with special medical needs. Children born out of wedlock may not be recognized in some states. Charitable giving may not occur. Additionally, if no living descendants are located the estate may “escheat” (go to) to the state coffers.

Control Who Will Take Care Of Your Minor Children

Preparing a Will and naming a guardian for your children places you in control of the person(s) you desire to meet the needs of your children and reflect your values. Without a Will the court may select a guardian from any family member, regardless if you were estranged during your life. If no family member agrees to guardianship or is deemed appropriate, the court may choose a state appointed guardian such as foster care.

Control Estate Taxes

Controlling taxes is a continuous event during our lifetime. An estate plan continues the control in minimizing estate taxes. A spouse may not take an inheritance tax free. Now is the time to put a plan in place to ensure the maximum of your legacy goes to your heirs rather than for taxes. Let’s revisit the example of music legend Prince. Without a Will or other estate planning, roughly one half of Prince’s estate could go to Federal and state taxes.

Control Probate

Having an estate plan helps speed the probate process, reduces probate costs, or in some circumstances, avoids probate completely.

Control Who Does Not Inherit

Earlier we discussed a plan to choose the exact people who receive your legacy. Now, we draw attention to controlling who will not inherit from your estate. An estate plan is your personal outline and direction of exactly how you want your personal legacy to be distributed. The estate plan allows you to be as detailed as possible and gives you the opportunity to exclude heirs making your intention of distribution clear. For example, perhaps some family members are financially established and you want to distribute assets based upon need, perhaps a family member may be incapable or irresponsible with money management needing small distributions of money over time using a trust, or perhaps a family member participates in lifestyle choices you may not wish to support.

Control Family Feuding

Estate planning may reduce the fighting and conflict among family members. Executing a well drafted estate plan places you in control of potential conflicts. Family members may not view your clear directions of dividing assets in a favorable manner, but your intentions will be clear to the court. Further, some states allow forfeiture/no contest clauses, indicating if an heir contests your estate plan then the heir may forfeit any gift made under the Will.

Control Charitable Legacy

An estate plan allows your legacy to live on by personally choosing charitable giving reflective of your values, interests, and social concerns.

Control Financial and Medical Care

Through estate planning with a Durable Power of Attorney, you control your financial and medical care in the event of a disability.

You can take control of your Life Plan now by engaging an experienced estate planning attorney to assist with the personal legacy you want to create. An estate plan expresses your values and outlines how you desire your assets to be preserved and protected. Who is in control of your legacy?

For more information about Life Plans, please contact our Wealth Management and Trust department.

Betting, Hoping and Planning

by Neil Byrne, JD, LLM, CPA Stock Yards Bank Wealth Management & Trust


It is almost Derby time. So what better topic to discuss than betting?

According to the dictionary, a bet is defined as “an act of risking a sum of money on the outcome of a future event.” Hope is defined as “a feeling of expectation and desire for a certain thing to happen.” Finally, a plan is defined as “a detailed proposal for doing or achieving something.”

All of these concepts are wonderful in their own right, and can bring joy to individuals in the right context. It is fun to bet on the Derby, or to hope your tournament bracket wins your office pool. Unfortunately, too many people are unnecessarily making a bet on retirement security by simply hoping their savings, Social Security, and other resources will be enough.

Most people choose their career, their college major, and their home, not to mention their spouse, among various other important items in their life. What about retirement? How many people are hoping to be able to retire “one day” but haven’t put together a detailed plan for actually retiring? If you have not put together a plan, then you likely are not planning for retirement, but rather, are betting on retiring – one day.

Below are a couple of items to consider when putting together a retirement plan. While things like investment returns, basis, and tax rates are unquestionably important, for a moment, we suggest that you think “bigger picture,” and ponder how some more basic considerations can affect your successful retirement plan.

Your Needs and Wants
Even the age at which you retire is up for consideration. After all, setting a uniform retirement age is said to have been started in Germany by Chancellor Otto Von Bismarck, at least partially as a way for him to force troublesome government employees into retirement. Germany initially set it at 70, and then lowered it to 65*. Of course, whether that is true or not, neither Chancellor Von Bismarck, nor anyone else should really dictate when you retire. Naturally, taking retirement benefits that are only available at certain ages into account is an important part of the plan. But, with a little foresight, you can retire when it is appropriate for you.

After all, retirement is about you. To ensure that you are making the best decisions, you will want to have a good handle on your family dynamics, as well as your budget, assets, and liabilities. Do you have robust savings that can withstand unforeseen expenses? Have you considered what your wants and needs truly are? It may be appropriate to “bet” or “hope” for a dream item down the road, but we want you to plan for your true needs and wants in retirement.

Your Biases
Personal biases can have long-term consequences, and so, many people have a critical need for objective retirement advice. A 2008 book by Professor Dan Ariely, Predictably Irrational, explains many of our biases and how they affect several facets of modern life. Two sections of the book, however, are especially relevant here.

First, people like to procrastinate – big surprise. But, it is true, and it can harm your retirement readiness.

Second, people like to keep all their options open for as long as possible, even when inaction produces a negative outcome. Undoubtedly, financial planning can be complicated. Moreover, retirement planning forces you to make an avalanche of choices – when should I draw Social Security? When should I stop working? Is Long Term Care Insurance for me? And on and on . . .

These two biases can work together to turn a plan into a bet before you even realize it. Betting may be fun on the first Saturday in May, but leave the betting for the track, and the hoping for your tournament bracket. Let’s plan for your retirement.

*See: https://www.ssa.gov/history/age65.html AND http://mentalfloss.com/article/31014/why-retirement-age-65

The Importance of Financial Planning at Any Age

DISCLAIMER: THIS ARTICLE WAS WRITTEN BY ADVICENT SOLUTIONS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. ©2013, 2016 ADVICENT SOLUTIONS, AN ENTITY UNRELATED TO STOCK YARDS BANK & TRUST. THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS ARTICLE IS NOT INTENDED TO BE TAX, INVESTMENT, OR LEGAL ADVICE, AND IT MAY NOT BE RELIED ON FOR THE PURPOSE OF AVOIDING ANY TAX PENALTIES. STOCK YARDS BANK & TRUST DOES NOT PROVIDE TAX OR LEGAL ADVICE. YOU ARE ENCOURAGED TO CONSULT WITH YOUR TAX ADVISOR OR ATTORNEY REGARDING SPECIFIC TAX ISSUES.

It’s easy to think that a financial plan is only necessary when you need to make a big purchase or rearrange your portfolio. However, financial planning affects much more than your bank account, and a successful plan should follow you through all the stages of your life. In a financial climate where more than half of Americans don’t have a budget and just over 40 percent of baby boomers don’t have a will, it seems that many could benefit from planning. Yet the fact remains that just one out of three household financial decision-makers say they have any kind of comprehensive financial plan. Prevalent among the reasons to avoid planning are “I’m too young to need a financial plan,” “I’m too old to get a financial plan,” or “I’ve made it this long without one, so why get one now?” When these doubts are raised, it’s important to consider that your financial plan isn’t something that can be made and then forgotten about, nor should it only be remembered when you find you’re low on funds; to succeed, it will need to be fluid and change as your situation changes. Read on to discover the importance of financial planning at any age.

ON YOUR MARK, GET SET, GO! PLANNING IN YOUR 20s

As a 20-something, you probably think that you’re too young and have too few resources to warrant a financial plan. Before you write off financial planning using this logic, consider that your 20s are when you establish the financial base for the rest of your life. You’re likely earning your first salary and dealing with your first large sources of debt in student loans and car payments. You may be faced with buying your own insurance and investing on your own for the first time. You also have the widest range of financial goals in your 20s, as most of your major life events are still ahead of you. Meeting with a financial planner during this time can improve your financial literacy, helping you learn things like how to set up an emergency fund, make a spending plan and establish good credit. It can also help you set up a basic estate plan, something that’s easy to overlook in your 20s. It can be overwhelming when you’re starting out to be bombarded with all of the things you could be putting money toward. A financial plan can help you prioritize where your money should go by determining your most significant money goals and how to reach them.

Not only are these years a crucial time for financial education, but disregarding a financial plan could cause you to unintentionally squander the biggest asset of your 20s—time. With the power of compound interest, the money you save or invest now can grow exponentially, but wait another 10 years and you may have to contribute a lot more to achieve the same end result. Bottom line? The earlier you start saving and the longer you give your money to grow, the better. There’s no better time to start establishing good money habits than in your 20s, and that all starts with a financial plan

TAKE IT TO THE NEXT LEVEL. PLANNING IN YOUR 30s

If your 20s are to build a foundation for your own financial literacy, your 30s teach you how to cope when that foundation shifts and you find yourself dealing with new and larger challenges. A financial plan at this age can help you deal with some of life’s biggest transitions, such as starting a family or becoming a homeowner. These can bring on newer and bigger sources of debt, so a crucial aspect of financial planning at this time is to eliminate non-mortgage debt, such as paying off your car and student loans and paying down credit card debt. These big life changes may also trigger a need for expanded insurance coverage on your home or extended life insurance, if you have a family depending on you. For the same reason, you should review your estate plan, making sure you have a will, living will and power of attorney. You set up the basics of a financial plan in your 20s, and it’s time to reevaluate now that your earnings power has likely increased. You should set a more definite plan for retirement and focus on contributing a set amount each month rather than just maintaining an account. A financial plan can help you review and understand your asset allocation among various types of investments, aligning your investment decisions with your lowered risk tolerance and time horizon. It’s also a good time to check on your emergency fund, and make sure you have three to six months’ worth of income saved should an unforeseen crisis affect your life. Finally, a financial plan can help you direct some of your increased earnings to charity, as you may be approaching a time in your life when you feel stable enough to give back.

MAKE IT OR BREAK IT. PLANNING IN YOUR 40s

Your 40s are a crucial decade for building up retirement savings, and a financial plan can help you make sure you’re on track. While many will start a retirement account on their own, it can be hard to budget for both retirement and non-retirement savings. In fact, roughly one out of three U.S. adults have no form of nonretirement savings. Without financial planning, it can be hard to focus on saving for multiple goals and prioritizing the importance of those goals at different times in your life. For example, although paying for your children’s education may be a factor during your 40s, remember that while there are loans and scholarships available for college, the same is not true for retirement. So, while it’s important to save for both goals, you may have to put your own savings first by allotting more money to a retirement fund than to your child’s education. This can be difficult, especially since most parents are used to putting their children’s needs before their own. Having the third-party perspective of a financial advisor can be especially on the best way to reach multiple financial goals. Your 40s are also a good time to do an overall review of your plan. You may need to increase your insurance coverage, as the insurance offered through your employer may no longer be enough to cover you and your family in the case of a crisis. You will also want to review your estate planning documents and make sure your beneficiaries are up to date. And, since your earnings are likely peaking and this is truly the “make it or break it” time for your retirement savings, your plan should help you determine how to allocate more money toward your IRA or 401(k).

IN THE HOME STRETCH. PLANNING IN YOUR 50s/60s (preretirement)

During this phase of your life, retirement stops being a far-off, abstract concept and becomes real. You should engage in retirement planning with your spouse, including choosing a retirement age and discussing the types of activities you’d like to pursue during retirement. You may want to evaluate your health, as health and insurance needs can factor heavily into your retirement budget. You should be estimating your Social Security benefits and maximizing contributions to your retirement account, including catch-up contributions that you are now eligible for. Since many large expenses, such as your mortgage payment, may soon be behind you, you can push to eliminate a lot of your debt so you can head into retirement debt-free. To stay on top of all of these tasks, you can think of your financial plan during this time as a preretirement checklist, ensuring you’ve covered all of your bases so that you can enjoy the relaxation you deserve during retirement. In addition to checking off your preretirement tasks, it’s likely that a large part of your financial planning will focus on protecting the retirement savings you already have and creating an income strategy for retirement. Because you now have a lower risk tolerance and less time to recover from a dip in the market, your investment strategy will probably need to be more conservative. Ultimately, your financial plan can help you cross-reference your retirement needs and goals with your retirement income, and your financial advisor can help you project whether this income can provide for you throughout your retirement.

KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON. PLANNING DURING RETIREMENT

You may think that once you reach retirement, you no longer have to worry about financial planning. After all, you’ve made it this far, right? However, there are many unique financial considerations for retirees, not the least of which is how to effectively transfer your wealth to the next generation. You should review your estate plan to make sure that everything is up-to-date and correct, and determine how you want your wealth to be allocated upon your death. Depending on your situation, this may include providing for family and/or friends, setting up trusts or making arrangements for an after-death charitable donation.

As your health needs change during retirement, a financial plan can also help you consider the impact of different senior living options on your budget and evaluate what kind of health care and insurance you need and are eligible for. Similar to your younger years, you will likely have a lot of planning surrounding cash flow issues and how to make the most of your income. Far from being over, financial planning can play a large role in your retiree years, helping you live out the remainder of your life comfortably and with peace of mind.

Stock Yards Wealth Management & Trust wants to be your partner in your financial journey. Our team of Financial Planners provides a process that is complete, from start to finish. We provide a comprehensive set of solutions that are customized to fit your individual needs. No matter what phase of life you are in, we provide the plan and the guidance to help ensure that you are on track to achieve your financial goals.

 

In The News – Great Britain Leaves European Union

AMark

June 24, 2016

Dear friends and clients,

In a very close vote the citizens of Great Britain voted to formally leave the European Union. Prime Minister David Cameron has resigned and will step down in October after failing to rally support for remaining a part of the EU. Global stock markets are responding negatively and the Euro and Pound are both falling against other currencies. The U. S. stock market responded this morning with a negative opening.

What are the consequences of the vote? There is a real fear that the British vote will be the beginning of the end for the European Union by encouraging other members to leave. This would have negative implications for global trade and further weaken economic growth in both Great Britain and Europe. Markets are being negatively impacted by the uncertainty surrounding the process of leaving the EU. Strategists are also concerned about the impact on the sales and earnings of multinational companies domiciled in the United States and the rest of the world. Many of these companies gained access to European markets through Great Britain and will now be forced to contract separately with Great Britain and the EU. The rising dollar will also impact the earnings of U. S. multinational companies due to currency translation accounting rules.

The worst fears are probably being overstated. Great Britain will more than likely retain preferred trading status with the European Union. It is in the best interest of the EU to negotiate trade agreements without restrictions, penalties, or tariffs so as not to disrupt the fragile economic growth in that region. The strong dollar, stable political and economic environment, and the very low interest rates throughout the Eurozone will encourage capital flows into the United States which will support our capital markets.

What happens next? Prime Minister Cameron will travel to Brussels next week to meet with the other twenty seven member country leaders. They will begin the process of defining the new relationship between the EU and Great Britain politically and economically. His successor will then begin the formal two years of meetings required by law to negotiate Great Britain’s way out of the European Union and to renegotiate trade accords with member countries. European leaders will be focusing on the agreements necessary to regulate future trade between the EU and Great Britain, the access British companies will have to EU markets, and any banking restrictions on banks domiciled in Great Britain. The hope is Great Britain will still have access to the European mainland markets without tariffs or other barriers to trade.

In conclusion, expect continued market volatility. We advise clients to remain invested through these periods of higher than normal uncertainty. We will continue to manage risk in portfolios through the diversification and security selection process. Please contact your wealth advisor with any concerns or questions.

The Wealth Management Group

Louisville
200 South Fifth Street
Louisville, KY 40202
Phone: (502) 625-1005
Email:WealthManagement@syb.com
Indianapolis
11450 N. Meridian Street
Carmel, IN 46032
Phone (317)-238-2816
Email:WealthManagement@syb.com
Cincinnati
101 W. Fourth Street
Cincinnati, OH 45202
Phone: (513)-824-6146
Email:WealthManagement@syb.com

We provide the information in this newsletter for general guidance only. It does not constitute the provision of legal advice, tax advice, accounting services, investment advice, or professional consulting of any kind. The information provided herein should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional tax, accounting, investment, legal, or other competent advisers. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a professional adviser who has been provided with all pertinent facts relevant to your particular situation. The information is provided “as is,” with no assurance or guarantee of completeness, accuracy, or timeliness of the information, and without warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, including but not limited to warranties of performance, merchantability, and fitness for a particular purpose.

NOT FDIC INSURED | MAY LOSE VALUE | NO BANK GUARANTEE

Global Market Update

An Update on Recent Events in the Global Market

Global stock markets are continuing to decline with the S&P 500 down .74% yesterday morning , -3.33% year-to-date (YTD), and the MSCI World Index ex USA down 1.11% and -3.86% YTD.  Volatility measures for financial assets are also rising significantly.  There are several causes for the decline:

Oil Prices:  Oil prices continue to decline, which negatively impacts energy stocks.  The decline in commodity prices is also an early warning sign of decreased manufacturing activity.  Energy and commodity price weakness can impact a number of business sectors from steel to heavy equipment and all sectors are feeling the negative impact of lower prices and demand.

Geopolitics:  The North Korean nuclear test, ISIS, the dispute between Saudi Arabia and Iran, and the European immigration problem are all negatively impacting stock prices.  In addition, cyber terrorism continues to become a real threat.

Slowing Global Economic Growth:  The recession in Japan and continued slow growth in the Eurozone are instilling fears that global growth will fall and spillover into the US economy.

China:  China devalued the Yuan for a second time this week as growth slows as a result of its transition from a manufacturing to a consumer-driven economy.  The Chinese stock market declined 7% yesterday before the government implemented a trading suspension for the day and the Shanghai Composite is down roughly 15% from its December high.

Uncertainty:  Markets hate uncertainty, and there is a lot of it right now.  How much, how long, and when will the Federal Reserve increase interest rates again?  What will happen with US elections this year?  Will the United States experience another recession? Markets move on uncertainty in the short-term, but they focus on fundamentals in the long-term.

Fortunately, however, there are some positives!

US Economy:  We do not believe the United States will fall into a recession in 2016.  Recent economic activity continues to be positive on the services and employment front.  This is fueling an increase in consumer spending which is up 3.2% year over year.  Consumer goods and services represent the majority of our economy and are a good indicator of future economic growth.

Capital:  Capital continues to flow into the United States because of the stability of our economy and political system.  This should provide support for stock prices.  The low level of global interest rates makes the United States markets one of the more attractive investment alternatives.

Stock Prices:  Stock prices, while expensive, are still trading within a normal valuation range.  The forward PE ratio on the S&P 500 is at 23 times earnings as of Dec. 31st and the norm is something close to 17.5 times earnings.  The higher multiple can, at least partially, be justified by our very low interest rates.

Portfolio Diversification:  Diversification provides a safety net to portfolios during periods of uncertainty and increased stock market volatility.  Nearly all of our clients’ accounts are committed to fixed income in order to provide a cushion to portfolios during these periods of stock market volatility.

Security Selection: Our security selection process continues to concentrate on high quality, dividend-paying stocks, with conservative financials.  These companies provide protection in volatile stock markets because of their consistently strong sales and earnings and stable dividend yield.

If you have any questions or would like additional insight on any of the above points or would like more information about the Wealth Management Group at Stock Yards Bank & Trust Company, please call us at (502) 625-1605.

Giving Thanks & Giving Back

The holidays are often a time where we reflect upon our lives, give thanks for what we have, and look to give back to those in need. This time provides us the opportunity to evaluate the year and make our resolutions for the next. And ideally, your investments should fall somewhere in this process of reflection. After all, your portfolio, if planned well, can be a gift that has the potential to keep on giving, to you and the ones you love for many years to come. To help get you started this year, here are a few year-end investment tips that are always important to remember.

Evaluate your goals. What are the goals for your financial assets? Are they all achievable? Have they changed since last year? Sometimes these questions are the most difficult to answer, yet they are the most important. Alongside your time horizon, cash flow needs and tolerance for risk, these questions are the basis for your financial plan. And if you don’t have any investment goals or a financial plan, now is an excellent time to create one. Having a plan in place that is properly aligned with your goals gives you the best chances to succeed.

Review your diversification and harvest losses carefully. With the recent volatility in the markets, you’re probably looking to sell some underperformers in your portfolio and harvest some tax losses.  Be careful not to chase heat.  It can be easy to sell what’s done poorly and reinvest in what’s done well.  But no one investment style or category leads forever.  Stick to your benchmark and maintain your diversification.  And if your benchmark contains a 5% weighting in energy you should have close to that invested in energy as well (not 0%, but also not 20% – each of those carries too much risk).  Whether you think any one stock, sector, or fund still has room to rise or fall, remember you can always be wrong.  Even the best investors are often wrong about timing.  You don’t want to be caught on the wrong side.

Focus on your total return. Most investors want to compare their portfolio’s overall performance to how each individual investment performed. They want each individual stock, bond or fund to perform as well or better than the whole. But this isn’t how portfolio construction should work. There should always be stocks in your portfolio that perform vastly different from each other, and similar to their respective categories. If they don’t then you’re probably taking too much risk. Review the point above. This is the concept of diversification and it is immeasurably important to meeting those financial goals. Don’t always look to sell the underperformers. Focus on the total return.

Donate Stock, Not Cash. Finally, for those whose year-end goals include making donations to the charitable organizations you support, consider donating appreciated stock instead of cash.  It’s easier than you may think and saves you money.  Say you own a stock for which you paid $1,000 that’s now worth $2,500.  If you sell that stock, you’ll have to pay taxes on the $1,500 gain.  If you have a 33% combined tax rate, that’s $500 you’ll owe just to the government, leaving only $2,000 for the charity. Yet if you donate the stock, you will owe no taxes and the charity receives $2,500, and you have a $2,500 tax deduction.  A win-win for you and your favorite charity!

We hope you had a great year and we look forward to working with you in 2016. From all of us here in the Stock Yards Bank & Trust Wealth Management Group, Happy Holidays!