Tag Archives: IRA

Your Rollover Options

ira rollover 3Untitled-logoLeaving your job can be hectic, whether you’re retired, laid off or moving to a new company.  It may not cross your mind to take care of your previous employer-sponsored retirement plan, but this is an important box to check during your transition.


You have four options when it comes to your retirement assets: leave them with your former employer, roll them over into your new employer’s retirement plan, roll them over into an IRA or cash out. As with most financial decisions, there are pros and cons to each choice, and your specific circumstances may make one choice more appealing than the others.

Leave assets in your former employer’s plan

You can choose to leave your investments where they are when you leave your job, though you will not be eligible to continue making contributions. This is the default option if you choose to do nothing. However, if simplifying your retirement savings is your goal, this is probably not the route for you. If you leave your investments behind at each company, you’ll have various accounts to keep track of throughout your career and distributions to take from each during retirement. Keeping in touch withCapture roll.JPG former employers can be difficult. Your old plan may also have high fees, limited flexibility or poor allocation options when compared with an IRA or your new employer’s plan. If your retirement account has less than $5,000, your former employer has the option of cashing you out of the plan, incurring taxes and penalties. Avoid getting cashed out by rolling the money over when you leave the company.

There are some advantages to leaving your money with your former employer. For instance, some large companies have access to lower-cost institutional funds that your new employer might not offer. In this case, it would be cheaper for you to stay with the old plan than to roll over into a new plan or IRA. Additionally, if you’re 55 or older when you leave your job, you may be eligible for penalty-free withdrawals (though income tax would still apply), so keeping your investment in your former plan could give you access to money sooner.

Rollover into new employer’s plan

A rollover is moving assets from one account to another while avoiding taxes and penalties. You can move your assets from your old employer’s plan to your new employer’s plan seamlessly without losing any money. Choosing this option is advantageous because your assets will continue to grow in a tax-advantaged account, and you won’t have to start over at each new company. You can rollover assets from a Roth 401(k) to a traditional 401(k) and vice versa, as long as both plans allow for it. If your new company has a better selection of investments or lower prices than your previous employer, it makes more sense to do a rollover. This way, you can also avoid having to keep track of old accounts with former employers.

Rollover into an IRA

In general, an IRA will offer you the most versatility and flexibility, so if you’re unhappy with either your former or current employer’s plans, an IRA may be a better bet. An IRA can also be more convenient, because you won’t have to worry about rolling it over again if you leave your job in the future. One feature unique to IRAs is the ability to take penalty-free distributions early (before the age of 59 ½) in order to pay for your first home or qualified higher education expenses. You’ll still pay income tax on the distributions, but you’ll avoid the fees that you’d accrue if you cashed out of an employer plan. An IRA can also be a great vehicle for your heirs, who have the option of stretching out required minimum distributions with a traditional IRA, or avoiding them altogether with a Roth IRA.

There are two types of rollovers, whether you’re rolling your money into a new employer plan or an IRA. A direct rollover is from plan to plan. No taxes are withheld, no penalties are owed and no money crosses your hands. For an indirect rollover, your previous plan administrator writes a check to you, withholding 20 percent for taxes. You’ll have 60 days to transfer it to your new plan or IRA. If you exceed 60 days, you won’t get the 20 percent in taxes back when you file a return, and you’ll owe an additional 10 percent penalty for early withdrawals. A direct rollover is a simpler, safer route, but you’ll have to make sure you have an IRA or new employer plan established first.

Cash out

This is the option least likely to be recommended to you, but it can be useful in certain circumstances. It’s important to know that cashing out a retirement plan incurs a 20 percent tax and a 10 percent penalty for early withdrawal, so you won’t actually get the amount listed in your account. If you’re truly strapped for cash, or if you’re over age 55 when you leave your employer (thus avoiding the early withdrawal penalty), you may want to consider cashing out. However, cashing out is generally not advisable. In addition to the taxes and penalties, your money will lose its tax-advantaged growth, and you may be damaging your future financial security. Cashing out in order to reinvest in a new employer plan or IRA is a costly mistake many workers make each year.

Now that you know your options, you can make an informed decision about your retirement assets. Leaving your job for any reason can be stressful, but jeopardizing your retirement security would be even worse.

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This article was written byAdvicent Solutions, an entity unrelated to Stock Yards Bank & Trust Company.  The information contained in this article is not intended to be tax, investment, or legal advice, and it may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any tax penalties.  Stock Yards Bank & Trust Company does not provide tax or legal advice. You are encouraged to consult with your tax advisor or attorney regarding specific tax issues. © 2013 Advicent Solutions. All rights reserved.

 

Playing by the IRA Rules

ira rulesUntitled-logoIndividual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) offer favorable tax-deferral benefits to individuals who are saving for retirement. But with those benefits, there are certain rules about when distributions may be taken to avoid penalty taxes. Contributions to a traditional IRA, depending on your income and participation in employer-sponsored plans, may entitle you to certain current income tax deductions. Further, because your funds are not taxed until distributions begin, your savings have the potential for tax-deferred growth.

Generally, IRAs are designed to work as long-term savings vehicles, but you may be able to withdraw funds early and without penalty, provided your situation qualifies as an exception.

The Age 59½ Rule

The age 59½ rule provides that, if you take distributions from your traditional IRA before you reach the age of 59½, you may be subject to a 10% Federal penalty tax in addition to regular income tax. However, you may not have to pay the penalty tax if your early distribution meets certain requirements.

Exceptions

You may be eligible for penalty-free qualified distributions, if one of the following exceptions applies:

  1. You are taking distributions as the beneficiary of a deceased IRA owner. Generally, if you inherit an IRA, you are required to take required minimum distributions (RMDs) over a period no longer than your life expectancy. For non-spousal beneficiaries, RMDs must begin in the year following the year in which the IRA owner died.  Spousal beneficiaries may have additional time to begin taking RMDs, depending on certain factors, including whether they opt to treat an inherited IRA as their own. This penalty tax exception does not apply to spousal beneficiaries who opt to treat the account as their own IRA.
  2. You are paying for certain first-time home buyer expenses, generally referred to as qualified acquisition costs, such as buying, building, or renovating a first home. Distributions, which may not exceed $10,000, may be used to cover qualified costs for you, your spouse, your children, or your grandchildren.
  3. You, your spouse, or dependents have un-reimbursed medical expenses that total more than 10% of your adjusted gross income (AGI) (7.5% if you are age 65 or older, but only through 2016). If a medical expense for you, your spouse, or a dependent qualifies as an itemized deduction on your income tax return, it will generally qualify for this penalty tax
  4. The distributions are part of a series of substantially equal periodic payments (SEPPs) made at least annually that meet certain additional requirements. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) currently recognizes three methods for calculating SEPPS: the required minimum distribution method, the fixed amortization method, and the fixed annuitization method.
  5. Once SEPPs begin, they must be made for five years or until you reach age 59½, whichever is later.
  6. You qualify with certain physical and/or mental conditions as being disabled, determined by a physician and if the disability can be expected to result in death or continue for an indefinite duration.
  7. You are paying medical insurance premiums due to unemployment. If you lost your job, and received unemployment compensation for 12 consecutive weeks, you may take distributions from your IRA account, penalty tax-free, during the year in which you received unemployment compensation, or in the following year, but no later than 60 days after you have been re-employed.
  8. You are paying for higher education expenses, such as tuition, fees, and books at an eligible educational institution (generally all accredited postsecondary institutions). The distributions may not exceed your qualified education expenses, or those of your spouse, your children, or your grandchildren.
  9. The distribution is attributable to an IRS levy of the IRA.
  10. Reservists qualify while serving on active duty for at least 180 days.

IRAs are strictly regulated to ensure that they are used as vehicles for retirement savings. Therefore, they generally work best as long-term savings vehicles. However, if you do need income from your IRA before you reach age 59½, it is important to know if your situation excuses you from the penalty tax levied on early distributions before making a withdrawal. Playing by the rules may save you money and help preserve your savings for retirement. Be sure to consult your tax advisor to determine whether your individual situation will qualify as an exception.

Please visit https://syb.com/wealth-management-and-trust/how-we-serve-our-clients/ira-retirement-rollovers/.  for more information.

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The Importance of Financial Planning at Any Age

DISCLAIMER: THIS ARTICLE WAS WRITTEN BY ADVICENT SOLUTIONS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. ©2013, 2016 ADVICENT SOLUTIONS, AN ENTITY UNRELATED TO STOCK YARDS BANK & TRUST. THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS ARTICLE IS NOT INTENDED TO BE TAX, INVESTMENT, OR LEGAL ADVICE, AND IT MAY NOT BE RELIED ON FOR THE PURPOSE OF AVOIDING ANY TAX PENALTIES. STOCK YARDS BANK & TRUST DOES NOT PROVIDE TAX OR LEGAL ADVICE. YOU ARE ENCOURAGED TO CONSULT WITH YOUR TAX ADVISOR OR ATTORNEY REGARDING SPECIFIC TAX ISSUES.

It’s easy to think that a financial plan is only necessary when you need to make a big purchase or rearrange your portfolio. However, financial planning affects much more than your bank account, and a successful plan should follow you through all the stages of your life. In a financial climate where more than half of Americans don’t have a budget and just over 40 percent of baby boomers don’t have a will, it seems that many could benefit from planning. Yet the fact remains that just one out of three household financial decision-makers say they have any kind of comprehensive financial plan. Prevalent among the reasons to avoid planning are “I’m too young to need a financial plan,” “I’m too old to get a financial plan,” or “I’ve made it this long without one, so why get one now?” When these doubts are raised, it’s important to consider that your financial plan isn’t something that can be made and then forgotten about, nor should it only be remembered when you find you’re low on funds; to succeed, it will need to be fluid and change as your situation changes. Read on to discover the importance of financial planning at any age.

ON YOUR MARK, GET SET, GO! PLANNING IN YOUR 20s

As a 20-something, you probably think that you’re too young and have too few resources to warrant a financial plan. Before you write off financial planning using this logic, consider that your 20s are when you establish the financial base for the rest of your life. You’re likely earning your first salary and dealing with your first large sources of debt in student loans and car payments. You may be faced with buying your own insurance and investing on your own for the first time. You also have the widest range of financial goals in your 20s, as most of your major life events are still ahead of you. Meeting with a financial planner during this time can improve your financial literacy, helping you learn things like how to set up an emergency fund, make a spending plan and establish good credit. It can also help you set up a basic estate plan, something that’s easy to overlook in your 20s. It can be overwhelming when you’re starting out to be bombarded with all of the things you could be putting money toward. A financial plan can help you prioritize where your money should go by determining your most significant money goals and how to reach them.

Not only are these years a crucial time for financial education, but disregarding a financial plan could cause you to unintentionally squander the biggest asset of your 20s—time. With the power of compound interest, the money you save or invest now can grow exponentially, but wait another 10 years and you may have to contribute a lot more to achieve the same end result. Bottom line? The earlier you start saving and the longer you give your money to grow, the better. There’s no better time to start establishing good money habits than in your 20s, and that all starts with a financial plan

TAKE IT TO THE NEXT LEVEL. PLANNING IN YOUR 30s

If your 20s are to build a foundation for your own financial literacy, your 30s teach you how to cope when that foundation shifts and you find yourself dealing with new and larger challenges. A financial plan at this age can help you deal with some of life’s biggest transitions, such as starting a family or becoming a homeowner. These can bring on newer and bigger sources of debt, so a crucial aspect of financial planning at this time is to eliminate non-mortgage debt, such as paying off your car and student loans and paying down credit card debt. These big life changes may also trigger a need for expanded insurance coverage on your home or extended life insurance, if you have a family depending on you. For the same reason, you should review your estate plan, making sure you have a will, living will and power of attorney. You set up the basics of a financial plan in your 20s, and it’s time to reevaluate now that your earnings power has likely increased. You should set a more definite plan for retirement and focus on contributing a set amount each month rather than just maintaining an account. A financial plan can help you review and understand your asset allocation among various types of investments, aligning your investment decisions with your lowered risk tolerance and time horizon. It’s also a good time to check on your emergency fund, and make sure you have three to six months’ worth of income saved should an unforeseen crisis affect your life. Finally, a financial plan can help you direct some of your increased earnings to charity, as you may be approaching a time in your life when you feel stable enough to give back.

MAKE IT OR BREAK IT. PLANNING IN YOUR 40s

Your 40s are a crucial decade for building up retirement savings, and a financial plan can help you make sure you’re on track. While many will start a retirement account on their own, it can be hard to budget for both retirement and non-retirement savings. In fact, roughly one out of three U.S. adults have no form of nonretirement savings. Without financial planning, it can be hard to focus on saving for multiple goals and prioritizing the importance of those goals at different times in your life. For example, although paying for your children’s education may be a factor during your 40s, remember that while there are loans and scholarships available for college, the same is not true for retirement. So, while it’s important to save for both goals, you may have to put your own savings first by allotting more money to a retirement fund than to your child’s education. This can be difficult, especially since most parents are used to putting their children’s needs before their own. Having the third-party perspective of a financial advisor can be especially on the best way to reach multiple financial goals. Your 40s are also a good time to do an overall review of your plan. You may need to increase your insurance coverage, as the insurance offered through your employer may no longer be enough to cover you and your family in the case of a crisis. You will also want to review your estate planning documents and make sure your beneficiaries are up to date. And, since your earnings are likely peaking and this is truly the “make it or break it” time for your retirement savings, your plan should help you determine how to allocate more money toward your IRA or 401(k).

IN THE HOME STRETCH. PLANNING IN YOUR 50s/60s (preretirement)

During this phase of your life, retirement stops being a far-off, abstract concept and becomes real. You should engage in retirement planning with your spouse, including choosing a retirement age and discussing the types of activities you’d like to pursue during retirement. You may want to evaluate your health, as health and insurance needs can factor heavily into your retirement budget. You should be estimating your Social Security benefits and maximizing contributions to your retirement account, including catch-up contributions that you are now eligible for. Since many large expenses, such as your mortgage payment, may soon be behind you, you can push to eliminate a lot of your debt so you can head into retirement debt-free. To stay on top of all of these tasks, you can think of your financial plan during this time as a preretirement checklist, ensuring you’ve covered all of your bases so that you can enjoy the relaxation you deserve during retirement. In addition to checking off your preretirement tasks, it’s likely that a large part of your financial planning will focus on protecting the retirement savings you already have and creating an income strategy for retirement. Because you now have a lower risk tolerance and less time to recover from a dip in the market, your investment strategy will probably need to be more conservative. Ultimately, your financial plan can help you cross-reference your retirement needs and goals with your retirement income, and your financial advisor can help you project whether this income can provide for you throughout your retirement.

KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON. PLANNING DURING RETIREMENT

You may think that once you reach retirement, you no longer have to worry about financial planning. After all, you’ve made it this far, right? However, there are many unique financial considerations for retirees, not the least of which is how to effectively transfer your wealth to the next generation. You should review your estate plan to make sure that everything is up-to-date and correct, and determine how you want your wealth to be allocated upon your death. Depending on your situation, this may include providing for family and/or friends, setting up trusts or making arrangements for an after-death charitable donation.

As your health needs change during retirement, a financial plan can also help you consider the impact of different senior living options on your budget and evaluate what kind of health care and insurance you need and are eligible for. Similar to your younger years, you will likely have a lot of planning surrounding cash flow issues and how to make the most of your income. Far from being over, financial planning can play a large role in your retiree years, helping you live out the remainder of your life comfortably and with peace of mind.

Stock Yards Wealth Management & Trust wants to be your partner in your financial journey. Our team of Financial Planners provides a process that is complete, from start to finish. We provide a comprehensive set of solutions that are customized to fit your individual needs. No matter what phase of life you are in, we provide the plan and the guidance to help ensure that you are on track to achieve your financial goals.

 

Save or Spend: 5 Ways to Make Your Refund Count This Tax Season

According to the Internal Revenue Service, the nation’s taxpayers received an average tax refund of nearly $3,000 in 2015. This year, with more than 70 percent of taxpayers receiving a refund, the American Bankers Association is highlighting five tips to help them make the most out of their windfall.

“Tax season is a great time for consumers to reassess how they allocate extra cash,” said Corey Carlisle, executive director of the ABA Foundation. “It’s wise to take steps toward securing your financial well-being like storing your refund for rainy days or using it to get a jumpstart on saving for retirement.”

To help consumers make the most out of their money, ABA has highlighted the following tips:

• Save for emergencies. Open or add to a savings account that serves as an “emergency fund.” Ideally, it should hold about three-to-six months of living expenses in case of sudden financial hardships like losing your job or having to replace your car. Click here for more information regarding Stock Yard’s account options.

• Pay off debt. Pay down existing balances either by chipping away at loans with the highest interest rates or eliminating smaller debt first.

• Save for retirement. Open or increase contributions to a tax-deferred savings plan like a 401(k) or an IRA. Where can you get one? Stock Yards can help set up an IRA, while a 401(k) is employer-sponsored.

• Put it toward a down payment. The biggest challenge that most first-time home buyers face is coming up with enough money for a down payment. If you intend to buy a new home in the near future, putting your tax refund toward the down payment is a smart move.

• Invest in your current home. Use your refund to invest in home improvements that will pay you back in the long run by increasing the value of your home. This can include small, cost-effective upgrades like energy-efficient appliances that will pay off in both the short and long term. If you have more substantial renovations in mind, your bank can help with a home equity line of credit. Click here for more information on how to make the most of your investment.

Resource information provided by American Bankers Association